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Quote# 72498

[Judge deems national "Day of Prayer" unconstitutional]

It still boggles my mind how hard atheists are willing to work, in order to make sure they never hear anything about what they don't believe in. I mean, it's like me going to court to outlaw any talk of the Tooth Fairy, because I don't believe in her and it offends me that some people do. (Sorry if that spills the beans for some of you. ) Just ridiculous.

midwestmama, RR 60 Comments [4/25/2010 6:38:09 PM]
Fundie Index: 39
WTF?! || meh
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Thejebusfire

It still boggles my mind how hard atheists are willing to work, in order to make sure they never hear anything about what they don't believe in.

Has it ever occured to you that people of other religions were offended by the fact that the government would endorse only your day of prayer?

4/27/2010 9:17:56 PM

Quantum Mechanic

So a national day of prayer to the tooth fairy is OK?

4/27/2010 9:48:33 PM

DOS

@Thejebusfire

Funny FEW ever are. 99% of the people who bring these suits are ATHEISTS. Because other religions know that government "endorsement" is not the same as being forced to pray to the christian God. Not to mention buddhists, and hindus are fairly open to the worship and respect of other religions.

4/28/2010 1:47:40 AM



It still boggles my mind how hard atheists are willing to work, in order to make sure they never hear anything about what they don't believe in

Lol yeah, because you NEVER see fundies doing the same thing...

I don't care if you believe in God. I just want you to stop acting like this is a "Christian nation" and that I'm some kind of anomaly for not believing in it. That's why I don't like having "In God We Trust" on my money or "One nation under God" in the Constitution. A "National Day of Prayer" would be the government endorsing your religion, which by the way IS unconstitutional. It's SPECIFICALLY MENTIONED in the Constitution. In the First Amendment. So, uh, yeah.

4/28/2010 8:28:18 AM

caustic gnostic

To counterbalance this all, we need two other "National Days Of"...

1. Rational Thought.

2. Masturbating to Pictures of Bettie Page.

4/28/2010 9:21:26 AM

DOS

@#1152562

I suppose that the majority of americans ARE christian, and that many of the founding fathers were christian means nothing right? We are actually an atheist nation right? (and BTW secular is the same as state sponsored atheism. China is and the USSR examples of "secular" nations).

I also like how you ignore the part of the first ammendment, like all atheists do that protects the rights of religions INCLUDING christions. Its not just freedom "From" religion its also freedom OF religion. But i suppose the minority in a DEMOCRACY should rule and dictate over the minority right? Just like the Sunni minority of Saddam Hussein dictated over the Shites...because minority ideology come first regardless of the fact that most people disagree. What a perverted take on democracy

4/28/2010 1:34:48 PM

The Jamo

Yeah, maybe if you and your cronies stop coming over and knocking on our doors then we can consider this "argument" of yours. Until then, shut the fuck up.

4/28/2010 11:44:55 PM

Ebon

Uh, no.

8/29/2012 12:50:24 AM

Dr.Shrinker

It boggles my mind that your lot has no problem with congress wasting its time on a national day of prayer when there are real issues to be addressed.

And, no, I don't mean voting to repeal Obamacare for (literally) the 34th time!

9/8/2012 7:29:00 AM

Dr.Shrinker

@ DOS

"I suppose that the majority of americans ARE christian, and that many of the founding fathers were christian means nothing right?"

- Yes, you are right. The Constitution, and subsequent court rulings, have established conclusively and repeatedly that religion is a personal matter. It is not the government's job to endorse, promote or encourage any religious belief. And, no, an official statement of "figure it our for yourself" from the government is not sponsoring atheism, obviously.

And this business of the Founding Fathers' religious beliefs is really starting to annoy me. Declarations of faith were purposefully left out of The Constitution specifically because the FF's put their private feelings aside for the good of the nation. The fact that modern day religious zealots refuse to do that, and then claim that they are following the the FF's footsteps is nothing but a lie.

And for the record, the most common religion cited among the FF was Anglicanism. There were also a number of Unitarians, Quakers and Catholics among them. In other words, the majority of the FF belonged to denominations that modern fundamentalists refuse to consider Christian.

The second most common faith cited among the FF was Baptist/Congregationalist. In its early days the Congregationalist movement were enthusiastic supporters of secular (their word, not mine) states. Their movement was founded on the notion that it was everyone's duty to learn about the bible and decide for themselves what the proper path to God was, without pressure from the state. That's right DOS, we have the Baptists to thank for our modern day secular state. We literally could not have done it without them!

9/20/2012 9:59:58 AM
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