Home Archives Random Quotes Latest Comments Top 100 Submit Quote Search Log In

Quote# 8040

[Re: big bang]

So, where did the matter come from that exploded?

For God explains that He is the Alpha and Omega. And has always been. But science has yet to explain how this matter came to be. How can you compress matter into something the size of a dot on this page, when it is well known that certain things cannot be compressed beyond a certain point.

Example: I'd like to see someone take the water in our ocean and compress it to the size of a dot (.) on this page. Anyone?

Admin3, Evolution Fairytale Forum 17 Comments [10/3/2005 12:00:00 AM]
Fundie Index: 4
WTF?! || meh
Username:
Comment:



1
Darth Wang

Anything can be compressed far enough with enough gravity. Ever heard of a black hole? Besides, the matter was always there.

10/4/2005 12:26:53 AM

Winston Jen

I guess it's strangely fitting that he posted at a 'fairytale' forum.

10/5/2005 12:05:16 AM

Jaded Revenge

I'd rather nobody actually compress all the water though, cause we'd probably all die

11/5/2005 2:12:15 PM

Darth Wang

True, it would become a black hole, then due to its size, explode with the force of a trillion nuclear bombs.

11/5/2005 3:33:43 PM

Sierra

I'll take that challenge.

There are 326 million trillion gallons of water in the oceans. This works out to 1.23404425 × 10^24 cubic centimeters of water, and since the density of saltwater is 1.028 grams per cc, in our oceans there are 1.20043x10^24 grams of oceanwater.

Now, let's assume that the 'dot' is roughly somewhere between .001 and .01 cubic centimeters (since clearly we can't compress a three dimensional volume to a two dimensional length). We only need to compress it to the density of a neutron star to meet Admin3's challenge.

A neutron star with about the mass of the sun is 20 kilometers, or 2 000 000 centimeters, across. The mass of the sun is 1.98892 × 10^30 kilograms. If my calculations are correct, the equation looks like this:

(2 000 000)/(1.98892x10^30)=x/(1.20043 × 10^21)
X=.001207 centimeters.

So, yes, all the water in our oceans can be compressed down to the size of a dot. Take that, Christianity.



11/8/2005 1:12:41 AM

Sierra

I'll take that challenge.

There are 326 million trillion gallons of water in the oceans. This works out to 1.23404425 × 10^24 cubic centimeters of water, and since the density of saltwater is 1.028 grams per cc, in our oceans there are 1.20043x10^24 grams of oceanwater.

Now, let's assume that the 'dot' is roughly somewhere between .001 and .01 cubic centimeters (since clearly we can't compress a three dimensional volume to a two dimensional length). We only need to compress it to the density of a neutron star to meet Admin3's challenge.

A neutron star with about the mass of the sun is 20 kilometers, or 2 000 000 centimeters, across. The mass of the sun is 1.98892 × 10^30 kilograms. If my calculations are correct, the equation looks like this:

(2 000 000)/(1.98892x10^30)=x/(1.20043 × 10^21)
X=.001207 centimeters.

So, yes, all the water in our oceans can be compressed down to the size of a dot. Take that, Christianity.



11/8/2005 4:59:58 AM

Sierra

I'll take that challenge.

There are 326 million trillion gallons of water in the oceans. This works out to 1.23404425 × 10^24 cubic centimeters of water, and since the density of saltwater is 1.028 grams per cc, in our oceans there are 1.20043x10^24 grams of oceanwater.

Now, let's assume that the 'dot' is roughly somewhere between .001 and .01 cubic centimeters (since clearly we can't compress a three dimensional volume to a two dimensional length). We only need to compress it to the density of a neutron star to meet Admin3's challenge.

A neutron star with about the mass of the sun is 20 kilometers, or 2 000 000 centimeters, across. The mass of the sun is 1.98892 × 10^30 kilograms. If my calculations are correct, the equation looks like this:

(2 000 000)/(1.98892x10^30)=x/(1.20043 × 10^21)
X=.001207 centimeters.

So, yes, all the water in our oceans can be compressed down to the size of a dot. Take that, Christianity.



11/8/2005 5:01:20 AM

Ricky

Good job Sierra. You beat Admin3's challenge 3 times!

11/8/2005 6:25:30 PM

Sierra

Yea, sorry about the triple post. Apparently, refreshing the comments page re-posts whatever comment you posted.

11/9/2005 12:17:40 AM

wintermute

Theoretically doable, as other people have pointed out.

But I don't think a practical demonstration would be a good idea.

3/30/2007 6:38:46 PM

paegus

you're making a rather fundamental mistake though: the assumption that neutron stars even exist.

here's my albeit misscaled solution...

6/8/2007 9:41:43 AM

paegus

arg..

http://img528.imageshack.us/my.php?image=imagevs2.jpg


6/8/2007 9:43:24 AM

Dallen

"Example: I'd like to see someone take the water in our ocean and compress it to the size of a dot (.) on this page. Anyone?"

Doing that would turn it into a black hole you moron.

6/8/2007 10:25:30 AM

Fred Hoyle

Let's just compress all the water in Admin3 into a dot. That would be easy.

6/8/2007 10:46:08 AM

Laurel

Where did the matter come from? I don't know. And unlike you, I'll admit it!

6/8/2007 12:53:54 PM

TB Tabby

Actually, before the big bang, the universe was much, much smaller than that dot. About 1 Planck length, if I'm not mistaken.

3/1/2010 1:34:00 AM

Canadiest

Alpha means first and Omega means last. This may suggest longer than anything else but not "always".

And again I must rant,,,

An all-powerful God existed within nothing for untold eras? Being all by Himself with nothing to manipulate or relate too? He came about how and from what?!

Even Galactus came from the universe that was reduced to a singularity before the big bang that created ours. How ridiculous is that? Not as bad as your story


3/1/2010 6:43:38 AM
1